How to make an image look interesting

PERSPECTIVE, FRAMING, COMPOSITION, TONE

The Rule of Thirds:

The rule of thirds is applied by aligning a subject with the guide lines and their intersection points, placing the horizon on the top or bottom line, or allowing linear features in the image to flow from section to section. [citation, from Wikipedia]photo 37photo 38

Generally we find that aligning the focus/important subjects of an image to the meeting points of the lines make the final image appear a lot more interesting a pleasing to the eye. Below are some of my drawings from the project:

This drawing was made before I learned the Rule of Thirds and as you can see it does not line up to the grid points and is therefore a rather uninteresting image.
This drawing was made before I learned the Rule of Thirds and as you can see it does not line up to the grid points and is therefore a rather uninteresting image.
This example, though still poor, was a little better. The Creature lines up with the right 1/3rd line but the wave/mountain to the left does not.
This example, though still poor, was a little better. The Creature lines up with the right 1/3rd line but the wave/mountain to the left does not.
This image, however, is a very good example of the application of the Rule of Thirds. The Black Hole and the Che-Rah's head (which is what we ended up naming the aliens) align nicely to the convergence points on the grid and make the image very appealing to look at.
This image, however, is a very good example of the application of the Rule of Thirds. The Black Hole and the Che-Rah’s head (which is what we ended up naming the aliens) align nicely to the convergence points on the grid and make the image very appealing to look at.

Framing:

photo 40

The bottom image shows the concept of having a frame-within-a-frame, in this case being the table. Other examples of a frame-within-a-frame could be rocks, trees, buildings or any other object that could heighten the illusion of the viewer peering into the scene.

Perspective:

photo 39 photo 41

The angle of the shot will always intensify the drama of a scene. The chair when viewed from below looks imposing and powerful while the bottle when viewed from above appears weak and tiny. When comparing those to extremes to the top image of a bottle viewed head-on it appears rather dull and mundane.

The second image introduces us to the application of tone with perspective. The darker shades indicate that the object is close to us while the softer and lighter greys make the object appear further away.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s