The not-quite-schematic

finishedmap

We went with a kind-of Indiana Jones style with the map, tea and coffee staining the page to differentiate between the sea (lighter) and the land (darker). We zoomed in our frame to fit only the area where the soldiers trekked. The quote-unquote thin red line represents the route, as well as the passage of time. The line starts at the top right and travels anticlockwise. The beginning of the line would represents 0:00:00 in the film, aka, the beginning; the part when the red line passes from the sea to the land is at roughly 0:28:31, when the soldiers storm the beach, and the end of the line is at 2:49:00, when the movie ends. ( I did try to remain as faithful to the actual historical route as possible, but I made a few changes the likes of which I shall explain later.

As there were so many characters we had to create off-screen events for, we had to be resourceful with the space we had. We couldn’t write every single detail of these character’s lives on the timeline, so we thought of a different approach to the problem.

Each white slip of paper contains a number that represents the time in the movie when a certain character is onscreen. The numbers are coloured according to the character the represent, for instance, one of the characters I chose to focus on, Sergeant Keck, is represented with the colour red (I chose this because he’s the only character we chose who dies on-screen). To properly elaborate on each character we decided to have a separate folder for each individual to properly tell their story:

file1file2file3file4

I decided to turn my character files into individual military folders. That way, we could reference the times the character appeared onscreen (tying it in with the map) and write a proper big story arc for the character and fill in the off-screen parts without the map getting cluttered. Files would have a hand-drawn sketch of the character on the front bordered with the colour that will represent them on the map (with the numbers).

The file would be neat, and the pages slightly battered, bloody even, if the character was killed on-screen. The events would be written somewhat like a diary, or private journal. Either way, the pages would give the reader insight into the character’s background and psyche.

This is what my character, Sergeant Keck’s character profile looks like:

file5 file6 file7

As you can see it is lovely and bloody as this character does in fact, and I quote, blow his butt off in the film.

There is a full page dedicated to Keck’s backstory, and five pages dedicated to on and off screen events during the film. Keck’s file was used as a template for the other members of the team to create their character profiles.

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